Two poems by Kevin Reid

Kevin Reid lives in Athens, Greece. His poetry can be read in various online and printed journals including Prole, The Interpreter’s House, Ink Sweat and Tears and Under the Radar. His mini pamphlet Burdlife (Tapsalteerie) was published in 2017 and his latest pamphlet Androgyny (4word) was published in May 2018. A new pamphlet is due in late 2020.

 

For the One Who Lay in My Nest

Unmarried, he watched my laugh turn red-eyed,
ferried junk to jerks every Friday like clockwork.
He was a true-man for a lying woman. A smirk,
a gob job to a sad-hand like me. I was damned

by his denim throb, his command rammed into
her palm with a Wish You Were Here soundtrack.
I didn’t score in his war of motorbike parts. Engine
oil and leather weren’t riches for small town hippies

I had given up Catholicism. But in this air of fuckin
affairs, I cared for prayers even if God didn’t exist.
My plan was to move into a matt black caravan.
Old and split at the seams, I opened the door.

He gave me a letter, left me food of the gods and
quotes from the bible. Now, a sacred trendsetter,
he cooks omelettes with cheddar and shrooms,
composes classical tunes on his upright piano.

 

Ode to Soap

Dear soap, I am sorry for not being the best
at staying in touch. Over the years I have tried
to maintain regular contact, but in some ways
I have failed you. I have stood at kitchen sinks,
and wash-hand basins with you in mind, stared
out of windows and into mirrors, held you
in my hands, grateful for your intentions;
Imperial Leather and Pears in childhood,
the gentle Dove in rough times. You were
the friend who cleared the grime of money,
wiped the stickiness of all those juicy peaches.

Now that we find ourselves desperate in days
of disease, I can’t remember the last time we
had so much contact. You are family that does care,
a friend that doesn’t hold a grudge, the kind who
picks-up where we left-off no matter how long
it’s been. For this, I am grateful. I do care. I need
to write that because I’m not so sure you know. I
know you have others to see, to keep in touch with,
who need  you as much I do. I know how important
and popular you are. Holding hands with you is virtual
and is encouraged in these times of social distancing.
I wish I could do the same with my daughter.